Phylogeny of the Viperine snakes (Viperinae)

Part I. Character analysis : a contribution in celebration of the distinguished scholarship of Robert F. Inger on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday
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Field Museum of Natural History , Chicago, Ill
Viperidae -- Classifica
StatementHymen Marx, James S. Ashe, Larry E. Watrous.
SeriesFieldiana -- new ser., no. 51, Publication (Field Museum of Natural History) -- 1395
ContributionsAshe, James C., Watrous, Larry Elden.
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 16 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22184445M

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Get this from a library. Phylogeny of the viperine snakes (Viperinae). Part II, Cladistic analysis and major lineages. [James S Ashe; Hymen Marx; Robert F Inger]. @book{bhl, title Phylogeny of the Viperine snakes book {Phylogeny of the viperine snakes (Viperinae): a contribution in celebration of the distinguished scholarship of Robert F.

Inger on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday / }, volume = {n.s. no ()}, copyright = {In copyright. Digitized with the permission of the rights holder.}. Phylogeny of the Viperine Snakes (Field in Zoology New Series, No 51) by Hymen Marx (Author), James S.

Ashe (Author), Larry E. Watrous (Author) & ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Author: Hymen Marx.

Book Title Phylogeny of the viperine snakes (Viperinae): a contribution in celebration of the distinguished scholarship of Robert F. Inger on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday / ByCited by: 2. Phylogeny of the viperine snakes (Viperinae): a contribution in celebration of the distinguished scholarship of Robert F.

Details Phylogeny of the Viperine snakes (Viperinae) FB2

Inger on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday by Marx, Hymen; Field Museum of Natural History; Ashe, James S; Watrous, Larry Elden; Inger, Robert F. Phylogeny of the viperine snakes (Viperinae): a contribution in celebration of the distinguished scholarship of Robert F. Inger on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday Item Preview This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Pages: Mitochondrial DNA sequences suggest unexpected phylogenetic position of Corso-Sardinian grass snakes (Natrix cetti) and do not support their species status, with notes on.

Phylogeny and systematics of viperine snakes. III: resurrection of the genus Macrovipera (Reuss, ) as suggested by biochemical evidence In: Amphibia-Reptilia. Authors: Ulrich Joger 1, Hans-Werner Herrmann 2 and Göran Nilson 3 View More View by: Evolution and phylogeny of the genus Natrix (Serpentes: Colubridae) Article in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 87(1) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Sea snakes are found in the Indian Ocean and Pacifi c Ocean between latitudes 30°N and 30°S. On land, venomous snakes have been found from sea level up to altitudes higher than m in the Americas5 and Himalayas,6 and sea snakes dive to depths greater than m in the oceans.7 Fossils of snakes with venomous fangs from at leastFile Size: 1MB.

Herrmann H-W, Joger U, Nilson G. Phylogeny and systematics of viperine snakes. III. Resurrection of the genus Macrovipera Reuss,as suggested by biochemical evidence. Amphibia-Reptilia 13 (4): Linnaeus C. INTRODUCTION.

Description Phylogeny of the Viperine snakes (Viperinae) PDF

The phylogenetic affinities and classification of caenophidian ("advanced") snakes have been a matter of debate for decades. The great diversity of living species (> species), the limited range of morphological characters investigated thoroughly within the group, and the limited taxonomic and genomic sampling in molecular phylogenetic studies, have been.

The systematics of snakes in general and of poisonous snakes in particular can be extremely confusing, especially to those not experienced in the complexities of Cited by: The Gaboon viper (Bitis gabonica) is a viper species found in the rainforests and savannas of sub-Saharan Africa.

Like all vipers, it is is the largest member of the genus Bitis, and it has the longest fangs – up to 2 inches in length (5 cm) – and the second highest venom yield of any snake next to the King cobra.

No subspecies are currently : Reptilia.

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Herrmann HW, Joger U, Nilson G. Phylogeny and systematics of viperine snakes. III: resurrection of the genus Macrovipera as suggested by biochemical evidence. Amphibia-Reptilia. ;– The idea that viperine snakes and dice snakes cannot coexist on grounds of the niche overlap is supported by a research done at the lake of Geneva, Switzerland (Metzger et al., ).

What is written in this paragraph, is based on the above-mentioned research. Originally the viperine snakes existed in the lake of Geneva.

In the viperine snakes simple conical teeth are absent on the upper maxillary or jaw bones, which are of small size and can be moved upward or downward at will. The upper maxillæ in these latter snakes further bear each a so-called “poison-fang,” an elongated canaliculated tooth perforated by a canal which communicates internally with the.

specially for this book by Mr. Green. I have further to acknowledge the permission given by the Trustees of the British Museum, the India Office, and the Zoological Society, to reproduce a few figures from previous publications of which I am the author. In order to render this little book more useful, the account of the Snakes of Europe has.

A comparative study was carried out on the vertebral morphology of 54 species and subspecies of snakes from Japan and a few other East and Southeast Asian countries.

My purpose was to establish a character table for identification of Cenozoic fossil snake vertebrae frequently found in these regions. A total of 29 taxonomically useful characters were recognized. The validity of Cited by: Morphometries of the ectopterygoid in advanced snakes (Colubroidea): a concordance of shape and phylogeny.

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 27(2): – DOI: /jtbx. Handbook-Indian Snakes (out of print), As per the objectives of Zoological Survey of India, several groups of animals were included in the earlier series on "Fauna of India", "Handbooks". The present one forms a cont,All books from China,especially scientific and academic books,export Chinese and English version books to libraries and book stores over the world,China Scientific Book.

The book includes a key to the species, a synonymy for each species (with taxonomic comments in some cases) and information on distribution. A few venomous species are illustrated. Lee () presents a monograph on all the amphibians and reptiles of the Yucatán Peninsula, with descriptions, information on distribution and keys to the families Cited by: Type species: Vipera superciliaris PETERS is the type species of the genus Proatheris BROADLEY Phylogenetics: for a recent phylogeny of this and related Viperinae see Šmíd & Tolley Etymology: References: Bauer, A.M.; Günther,R.

& Klipfel,M. The herpetological contributions of Wilhelm C.H. Peters ().Common Names: Lowland Swamp Viper, Domino-bellied viper, Lowland viper. Molecular phylogeny and systematics of viperine snakes II. A revision of the Vipera ursinii complex. Proceedings of the 6th Ordinary General Meeting of the Societas Europaea Herpetologica AugustBudapest, Hungary:   Venomous Snakes in South Asia.

The number of different snake species found south of the Himalayas is estimated to be aroundincluding about 67 front-fanged venomous species of the families Elapidae and Viperidae –. Viperid snakes are represented by 26 species belonging to the true vipers (subfamily Viperinae) and pit vipers (Crotalinae).Cited by: Molecular snake phylogeny showing adult maxillary dentition and relative positions of the various fang types in snakes.

Phylogeny of snakes; b. lateral views of adult snake skulls with fangs circled in white; c. drawings of corresponding snake palates (ventral views) with maxilla colored red and fangs circled in black. ^ a b c "Macrovipera lebetina". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 9 August ^ Macrovipera lebetina at the Reptile Database.

Accessed 9 August ^ Brown JH. Toxicology and Pharmacology of Venoms from Poisonous Snakes. Springfield, Illinois: Charles C. Thomas. LCCCN ISBN Herrmann HW, Joger U, Nilson G () Phylogeny and systematics of viperine snakes. III. Resurrection of the genus Macrovipera (Reuss, ) as suggested by biochemical ia Reptilia, 13, The visual system comprises the sensory organ (the eye) and the part of the central nervous system which gives organisms the ability to process visual detail as sight, as well as enabling the formation of several non-image photo response detects and interprets information from visible light (visible to that species) to "build a representation" of the surrounding.

Snakes, Ophidia—regarded by some authorities as an order of the class Reptilia, by the author as a sub-order of the order Squamata, which includes besides the Lizards, Lacertilia, the Chameleons, Rhiptoglossa, and the extinct Dolichosauria and Mosasauria—may be defined as greatly elongate scaly Reptiles without limbs, or with mere vestiges of the hind pair, without .Types of Snake Venom As explained in the introduction venomous snakes can be classified into three classes the snake venoms for two are explain below: 1) The elapines, short front fangs (Proteroglyphs) snakes, which include the cobra, mamba, and coral snakes, their venom is neurotoxic (nerve toxins) and paralyses the respiratory centre.Molecular phylogeny of advanced snakes (Serpentes, Caenophidia) with an emphasis on South American Xenodontines: a revised classification and descriptions of .